Pose of the Week: Vrksasana

Wednesday, 05 September 2018 14:27

This week’s pose of the week is Vrksasana. Vrks means tree, so it’s tree pose. It’s a balancing pose.

The main challenge in this pose is to find symmetry and balance in an asymmetrical posture. Last week we looked at the hip in Utthita Trikonasana (Extended Triangle pose).  It’s the same action in Vrksasana.  

The main challenge in this pose is to find symmetry and balance in an asymmetrical posture. Last week we looked at the hip in Utthita Trikonasana (Extended Triangle pose).  It’s the same action in Vrksasana.  

So, the hip is in Trikonasana and the standing leg and the spine are in Tadasana.

However this pose is really about balance. It’s about fear of falling: a natural fear that is strong and ever-present. It also limits us from truly being inthe asana.  As with all yogasanas (except for Savasana) we have to resist against the earth’s gravitational pull and stay upright.  

How do we create the environment to maintain our balance in Vrksasana?

Firstly, there needs to be stability as we learnt in Tadasana. The standing leg and the spine and the whole torso are in Tadasana while we are in Vrksasana. There needs to be extension, vitality and stability. 

Mel Robin, author, teacher and scientist explains: “In order to balance, one must keep certain parts of the body as immobile as a broomstick while at the same time, one must maintain a mobile joint close to the floor, this joint is given 100% of the responsibility for keeping the whole structure in balance. It does this by sensing the falling torque and generating a counter-torque.” 

And, guess what? we become better at it the more we practice.

Secondly, the role of the eyes is paramount to the balance. More than one-third of the neurons in the brain are involved in some way in the visual process, so it’s not a surprise they are pretty useful in working on the balance. Try fixing your gaze on a stable point a few metres in front of you and work on your balance.  You’ll find if you’re able to steady your eyes you’ll be more likely to come into the balance and actually bein the pose.

To be in the pose means to find that point where there’s a sense of poise, a moment of release when you’re engaged, there’s a crack where you can go inside….

Interested in developing further on your deep understanding of the asanas? Join the Iyengar Yoga Teacher Training programme at Yoga Path starting next term…

http://www.yoga-path.com.au/blog/item/75-learn-to-become-an-iyengar-yoga-teacher

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